Men Amber Rock, Nancegollan

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Men Amber Rock is a natural granite outcrop or `TOR` that was once topped with a delicately balanced `LOGAN` Stone. It is located on the hill summit to the east of Nancegollan and Prospidnick, about 560 feet above mean sea level. Alix and I went up there on Wednesday, it is well worth the trip out with a beautiful bridleway walk starting from the old railway bridge at this location:

50°08’16.2″N 5°17’57.6″W

Once you reach the rock the 360 degrees views from the highest part of the bridleway from the top of the stone are stunning. It has quite an interesting history as quoted from The Geocaching website …..

Men Amber is a Logan Stone, this is a rock or stone, which has been placed on top of larger rock and is able to `rock` or move when pushed. These `rocking` stones are many thousands of years old and have considerable historical and religious significance. They were often used in Cornwall to make vows because it was said that “no one with treachery in their heart could make one rock”. Men Amber Rock was toppled from its tor in 1650 when a man called Srubsall, then Governor of Pendennis Castle, Falmouth under Oliver Cromwell, decided to push the rock off it`s seat. It is said that this came about due to one of Merlin`s prophecies: “that Men Amber would stand until England had no king”. Rev. Dr. William Stukeley wrote: “Main Ambres; petrae ambrosiae, signify the stones anointed with holy oil, consecrated; or in a general sense, a temple, altar or places or worship”. In 1754 William Borlase in his book, Antiquities of Cornwall suggested that Men Amber Rock was dislodged because “the vulgar used to resort to this place at particular times of the year, and paid to this rock more respect than was thought becoming to good Christians”.

In recent years Men-Amber Rock has been used as a site for a religious service on the date of Sithney Feast.

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