Trencom Hill – St Michael’s Way

 OS Explorer Map 102: grid reference SW518362

 Click on the individual images to see full screen….

Situated in the west of Cornwall, Trencrom Hill is well worth a visit. It is located just west of Hayle and south of St. Ives and dominates the local area, towering over Lelant Downs. From the granite outcrop on its summit there are breathtaking views over St. Ives and in the other direction Mounts Bay. There is almost an aerial view of Carnsew and Copperhouse pools at Hayle. The estuary and the north coast beaches of Gwithian and Godrevy can be seen clearly on a day like this.

Trencrom Hill 550 ft (or Trecrobben) is a prominent hill fort, owned by the National Trust, it is crowned by an Neolithic Tor enclosure and was re-used as a hillfort in the Iron Age. Hut circles can be seen in the level area enclosed by the stone and earth banks. The hill was recorded as Torcrobm in 1758 which is derived from Cornish “torr crobm”, i.e. ‘hunched bulge’.

Trecobben, the giant of Trencrom, was supposed to have killed Cormelian (wife of Cormoran) by throwing a hammer across to St Michael’s Mount.

There is a free but small car park at the base.

Ilfracombe Museum, Devon

Formerly the laundry of the magnificent Ilfracombe Hotel, Ilfracombe museum is overflowing with curiosities and memorabilia. This historic building houses unimaginable finds – from a shrunken head to a collection of pickled bats. First opened in August 1932, the original curator was Mervyn G Palmer, who started it all following his explorations in South America collecting for the British Museum.

I took these images from the nostalgic times of the record player corner, though I wish now I had created a few images of the bats and shrunken head!

Hopefully some or one of these might end up on a book cover for the Arcangel Agency.

Click on the images for the slideshow ….

Bideford Long Bridge – North Devon

20150507_devon_ilfracombe_c6d-1-Edit

Bideford Long Bridge has quite a potted history and hopefully a long future ahead of it. It was originally constructed in timber around 1286 but due to regular need of repairs it was then became a masonry bridge in 1460 using the timber bridge as scaffold. The pointed arches certainly give it a medieval look.

In 1987, a new high-level trunk road bridge was constructed over the River Torridge, north of Long Bridge which you can see in the distance this relieved traffic loading on the old structure, which is the route we took to Ilfracombe.

Homage to Daphne ….

There is no better time than early spring for a stroll through the bluebell bedecked paths of Helford to Frenchman’s Creek. Finding swathes of ‘ramsons’ (wild garlic) in a dark wood is one of the joys of early spring, with the bright green leaves and strong garlic smell tempting you to gather for the pot. I gathered a few leaves but shall be back for more to make some pesto! Lunch in the Shipwright Arms is a perfect finale.

Click on images for full screen slideshow view

St Michaels Way Walk – St Uny churchyard Lelant

20150414_cwall_SMW_day001-53

Part of walking St Michaels Way is the very atmospheric churchyard of St Uny, especially when the sea mist rolls in on que! The church itself is very beautiful and worth a visit but to wander around the ancient stones of the churchyard you can be transported back to the past very easily, especially when you have an imagination like mine!

20150414_cwall_SMW_day001-61

St Uny’s church dates back to the 12th century, originally called St Euny’s church, the present building whose features are mainly Norman is thought to be from the 15th century. It is thought that the church was rebuilt at a time when wind blown sand silted up the Hayle estuary and encroached on Lelant, the vicarage itself was buried in sand. A number of ancient Cornish crosses can be found in the graveyard.

In the 14th century, Lelant lost an estimated 40% of it’s population with the Black Plague, many were buried in the church grounds.

20150414_cwall_SMW_day001-75Many 5th and 6th centuries Celtic missionaries arrived in numbers from Wales and Ireland, settled on the shores of Cornwall, and began converting small local groups of people to Christianity. Lelant church is dedicated to the Irish Saint St Euny or St Uny.